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PostPosted: Mon Jun 25, 2012 10:06 am 
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Hi, everyone.

Those of you who own Behringer Truth in their studios http://www.behringer.com/es/Products/B2031A.aspx, Can you please do me a little favour please? I need to know how much (dB) does a sound level meter reads while they're operating, loudest level possible. Maybe you could play busy orchestra music for the test.

I will highly appreciate this as it will help me in evaluating level of required isolation for my new studio. I only run those in my home studio, so they would represent total sound level in my studio.

Thanks for any efforts.


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 25, 2012 11:01 am 
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According to the manual, they can produce a maximum of 116 dB SPL, for the pair. ( http://www.behringer.com/assets/B2030A_P0135_M_EN.pdf , see page 9.)

However, regardless of how loud the speakers CAN be, your listening level should be set to 85 dB, and the room should be design and calibrated for that same level. That's the "standard". Sure, you might turn things up a bit louder to check something in the mix, but the normal listening level should be 85 dB. Any louder and you run the risk of damaging your ears, permanently. Even 85 dB is a bit loud for continuous monitoring all day: 80 dB would be better.

- Stuart -

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PostPosted: Mon Jun 25, 2012 5:31 pm 
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I once (for a lark) had mine measuring 115 dB and there was still more travel to go on the volume control but I was seriously afraid for my windows - papers were blowing off the desk and you could seriously feel the wind being generated in your face and hair. You ever seen the ad where a guy is sitting infront of his stereo and his hair is being blown straight back - well I was nearly there.

They can generate and handle this kind of power, no problem, but seriously, as nearfileds, you'll never turn them up this high - but you'll know that you've got plenty of headroom and at 85 - 96 dB the amps are not being driven to their extreme - i.e. they are still on the linear part of their operating curve.

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PostPosted: Mon Jun 25, 2012 7:04 pm 
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So if my only source of sound in my home studio are those monitors, can I base my insulation needs upon the 80(dB) DSP figure?

Furthermore, I'm assuming sound level metering does not have alot to do with room and monitors calibration/tuning. Please correct me if I'm wrong.


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 25, 2012 7:33 pm 
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Not sure what you mean by
Quote:
the 80(dB) DSP figure
and I assume you refer to isolation rather than insulation (as mentioned in your last post).
Basically if you're designing from scratch then 96dB (though I'd suggest 100) minus the tolerable or acceptable level will give you an indication of the transmission loss you'll need to aim for and hence the required isolation. If modifying an existing room then you really need to measure in the neighbouring areas with a reference signal in the room of, as above, 96 or 100 dB. The levels measured will show what the existing TL is then you'll know how much you need to add to this to achieve your desired level.

In a larger room, there is more inherent loss within the room itself (larger airspace) so the size of the room does indeed have an effect on how much isolation will be necessary. In a mixing scenario, because the engineer to monitor distance is "close" - the dB level (at listening position) is 85-96 dB regardless of room size.

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PostPosted: Mon Jun 25, 2012 10:14 pm 
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You are right thank you, I meant isolation not insulation. :oops:

Quote:
if you're designing from scratch then 96dB (though I'd suggest 100) minus the tolerable or acceptable level will give you an indication of the transmission loss you'll need to aim for and hence the required isolation


How would I measure the sound level (behind the two new walls) to know if its accepteble when the place has not been created yet. My project is a mixing room inside my basement as you can see below. There is just one big room at the moment. The walls have not been added yet?

Thanks,.


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 25, 2012 10:53 pm 
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Quote:
How would I measure the sound level (behind the two new walls) to know if its accepteble when the place has not been created yet.
First, measure how loud you are, with a sound level meter. The 80, 95, 96, 100 and 116 dB levels mentioned so far are all hypothetical: the only way to determine how loud YOU are, is by measuring it. Set up your system in the room that you plan to use, play a typical mix at the typical maximum volume that you normally would use, and measure what that is on your meter. Then go into the room next door and get someone else to turn down the volume on your system until it gets to the level where you can no longer hear it. Measure that level. The difference between the two is the MINIMUM amount of isolation that you need. In reality you might need more, since you are still measuring the ambient level of the "room next door", and depending on your building and the surroundings, that level might still be too high.

There are probably also legal limits on how loud you can be outside your building, so you need to take those into account.

But the bottom line here is that you need a sound level meter to determine what these levels are. And you'll need a sound level meter later anyway, when you set up the system, in order to correctly calibrate it to 85 dB. It will also be useful in helping with decisions about treatment, etc.

- Stuart -

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PostPosted: Tue Jun 26, 2012 1:17 am 
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This information is so informative for a beginer like me who can't even guess the obvious :oops:

I just need to confirm something though. It's a basement, so the only room next to it is the living room upstairs at the end of those stairs. More than 3.10 Meter hight. Isn't that a bit far for that purpose, considering that the target space (the new left over space) (see pic) is so much closer than that. So will the test be any accurat then.

The other thing, there is that window near the ceiling (see pic) which also leads to the area outside. So should I test the sound in that area too, and upon which tests can I base my decission?


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