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PostPosted: Fri Jul 13, 2012 8:09 pm 
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I've made a concrete door which consists of 3" x 2" C16 tanalised wood made into a frame 3 inches deep, I clad one side in 12.5mm plywood and filled the door with concrete so it was level with the top of the wooden frame. The concrete was left to dry and another sheet of 12.5mm ply used to to clad that side, AC-50 acoustic sealant was used to bond and seal the ply to the frame along with screws every few inches all round.

I'm not sure if this would pass any type of building code or regulations but it's worked for me. The door could actually be made a bit thinner as I found the weight was much higher than that of the dense concrete blocks I used for the wall. It probably weighs around 250kg. I hung the door with 5 very high grade hinges, although I may add one or 2 more to make it extra safe


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PostPosted: Sat Jul 14, 2012 4:04 am 
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Location: Santiago, Chile
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I've made a concrete door which consists of...
Wow! That sound pretty cool. Got any pictures of that? It would be neat to see how you did it. And I bet it isolates rather well. A pair of those should be awesome for isolation.

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PostPosted: Sun Jul 22, 2012 7:15 pm 
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I've just done some testing of my new super doors and they really do the trick, the shear mass of them just blocks everything, I've made one the way I mentioned earlier and the other has a core made from 5 layers of 12.5mm acoustic plasterboard sandwiched and sealed together with AC-50 acoustic sealant, I've still got to put the seals on them, but I must be getting an STC of about 65 just as they are, the plasterboard door is hanging on a 'room in a room' construction with 2 layers of acoustic plasterboard and RW3 rockwool in the cavity, the outer room is just a normal brick constructed garage and has the concrete door. I've still yet to seal everything properly, but we had a band rehearsal in there the other night and you could barely hear a thing outside, probably about 50db or so, the general outside background noise is around 60db so it's difficult to measure anything properly until later in the evening, I'll put some pics and stats on as soon as I've got some reliable figures


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 22, 2012 7:29 pm 
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Spot the slight error in judgement on where the end of the bench was :)

Image

Concrete door going into place

Image

The dangerous part, the door did fall once when I was trying to stand it up on my own, it put a crack in the concrete inside, luckily I managed to avoid getting flattened and I sealed the crack with sealant which seems to have worked OK

Image


The finished front of the Studio

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The 2 doors in place

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PostPosted: Sun Oct 14, 2012 8:56 pm 
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Location: Norway
Very cool Freestyle_Media !
That's really DIY, and looking good.

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PostPosted: Fri Oct 19, 2012 12:27 pm 
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Location: canada
has anybody tryed the safe n sound acoustic doors? or is solid wood door better? im doing a double door system and adding mass to the door with greenglue and acousitic foam. also all sealed. i was gonna go with the safe n sound door cuz of price but any input is appreciated. thanks


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 12, 2013 4:31 am 
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Location: Seattle WA
Does anyone know of any type of device that could put pressure on the inside of a door which "squeezes" it into its respective seal? I either didn't do a spectacular job or things have moved a bit.

In my head I picture some sort of "marine grade" device which has a "tightening wheel"(??) and 2 feet that push on the door jamb and the door at the same time. I'm too lazy to draw this atm, however.

(For the record, I'm now practicing with an extremely loud band in my garage at ridiculous hours of the night/morning in a very quiet, residential area so let it be known that if you follow the rules here you will probably prevail. 100% isolated room within a room. 3 layers of drywall. And oddly enough, the lows seem to be taken care of. The guitars seem to escape a bit and the tiny crack of my imperfect seal seems to be the culprit. Crazy.)

I've got a bolt/lock that serves this purpose on the top part of the door and I'd rather not put another whole in it to fix it at the bottom. The bottom part tends to bow out a bit (probably from the pressure of the bolt/lock above it) and that's what I'd like to "squeeze" into the seal.

Any good ideas?

One of these days I'll post pics of my project. Took me about 5 years to finish. HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!

But it works. :cop: :finger:


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 12, 2013 6:23 am 
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One option is to use a magnetic seal for one of your seals. The same type as you find around the edge of a refrigerator door. Guarantees that the entire seal is air-tight.

- Stuart -

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PostPosted: Sun Jan 13, 2013 1:36 am 
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Location: Seattle WA
Hey Stuart.

Do people usually use the magnetic stripping in conjunction with the trunk rubber?

Or is it just a 'magnetic stripping alone' type deal?

Thanks (as always) for the response!


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 14, 2013 7:15 pm 
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Location: Netherlands
There are plenty of options available. Magnetic (with or without seals) solutions, check Lou's topic. Or these 'ball' closers, dunno the name. I myself use automatic door-closers which are spring loaded, check viewtopic.php?f=2&t=5506&start=135#p125170


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 28, 2014 2:24 am 
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Location: W 85 14.089 , N 29 41.685
I will be making doors our of 2x4's plywood on one side sheet rock on the other insulation in the middle. Each door is about 4" thick.


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 28, 2014 11:57 am 
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I will be making doors our of 2x4's plywood on one side sheet rock on the other insulation in the middle.
That makes a two-leaf door. Two of those back to back is four-leaves :shock: , so the low frequency isolation of such a door would be very poor. That's why the general recommendation is that each door should be a single leaf, very sold, very massive, so that the two back-to-back doors make a proper 2-leaf system.

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PostPosted: Wed Jan 29, 2014 1:24 am 
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Location: W 85 14.089 , N 29 41.685
Please explain 2 doors back to back? I'm just going to have one of those doors for each door enterance. NOT two. one two leaf door NOT two two leaf doors


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 29, 2014 3:26 am 
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Please explain 2 doors back to back? I'm just going to have one of those doors for each door enterance. NOT two. one two leaf door NOT two two leaf doors
Good isolation for any studio is based on the MSM principle, also known as fully-decoupled two-leaf isolation. In other words, if you want decent isolation ("soundproofing") for a studio, then it has to be built such that the walls and roof are two-leaf systems, where the leaves are separated from each other by an air gap. So for example you might have an outer leaf that consists of OSB with siding on it, attached to one side of the first stud frame, then an inner leaf that consists of two layers of drywall attached to one side of the second stud frame, and the two frames do not touch each other. That's a two-leaf system. This is sometimes also called "room-in-a-room" construction, since basically that's what it is! You build one room inside another room.

So, since the walls have to be built as two-leaf systems, that means that you MUST HAVE TWO DOORS for each entrance: one door goes in each leaf. One door is in the outer-leaf, attached only to that first stud frame, and the other door is in the inner-leaf, attached to the second stud frame.

If you only have one door, then that means the other leaf has an empty hole in it, where the door should have been, and therefore there is no isolation at all...


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 30, 2014 1:48 am 
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If you read my new post on my thread I'm not sure that I need a total wall in side wall system as my MAXIMUM (The highest I ever got rounded up, not counting the planes flying over head but they are doing that alot less now) readings for A range fast 48db and slow 42db and for the C range 75db fast and 62 db slow. A single wall with cement board on both sides and batt insulation in the middle has an STC of 41 which correct me if wrong is roughly 41 dbs of noise reduction the C and A ranges and, if that is correct that means I would need maximum 1db of A and 21db of C in my rooms. What is the acceptable db of noise in a studio? Are you trying for zero? But that is only when a semi-truck goes by and that is about 0-2 times a day but you never know when. Ambient For A fast & slow are both under 30db and meter will not register with my meter and Ambient C is 42db fast and 38db slow and 50db fast and 42db slow near my neighbors AC/ Heat.

So Except for the live room I'm thinking that everything else will be single walls.


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