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PostPosted: Sun Dec 14, 2008 12:34 am 
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James Wrote:

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I guess you can go ahead and make us feel even smaller by showing us your mic cupboard!!! I already know what my reaction will be...


ROFLMFAO................ :lol: :lol: :lol:

James - The cupboard cost £89.99 from Argos, and the mics went on Sarah's credit card! :shock: :shock:

That said - You will absolutely love it..................promise.

Kind regards, and, when the hell we gonna' hook up?

Lou. 8)


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 15, 2008 3:49 am 
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Lou wrote:
That said - You will absolutely love it..................promise.



I am sure I will. I look forward to seeing what the hell you have come with now old man! Haha! You never cease to amaze me, that is for sure.

Lou wrote:
Kind regards, and, when the hell we gonna' hook up?



Well, unfortunately, it is not like we live down the block form each other, eh?

One of these days, I am going to take my lovely bride over the pond for a visit. And when I do, you can bet your butt that I will make sure to stop by with that bottle of wine in hand that I have promised to bring you!

Of course, you are always to take the trip west and bring me a bottle as well!!! ;)

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 09, 2009 7:00 am 
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Very much enjoy this thread. Nice setup. Currently in the mist of planning upgrade of my current studio space in a basement location. Looking back through the thread I was wondering the thought process or decision to go with engineered wood floor that is glued to sub floor structure in control room vs other available options such click together, lock and fold, etc? What is your recommendation regarding selection of proper engineered wood floor product that can be applied directly over concrete as observed in your live room? Thanks much.


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 10, 2009 1:36 am 
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Hey James, welcome to the Forum!

Thanks for your comments, one of these days, I need to get someone down there with a real camera, and take some final pictures. We have been busy recording pretty much non-stop, so it is hard to find a day when the place is clean enough to snap some pics!

Regarding the floor...

I personally do not like the look of laminate flooring. I put some down in the living room of my house, and wish that I never did. It looks "OK", but it is just not the look I was going for. Acoustically, I am not sure that it matters, but I have read some discussions on this topic back and forth as which one is better, wood or laminate. I knew all along that I was going to go with real wood from an aesthetics stand point, and the glue-down product is the only wood floor product that I know of that you can put on a concrete base. Nail-down wood flooring is obviously not going to work!

As long as you like the look of the laminate, it should work just fine. There are lots of folks around here that have taken that exact route, and achieved great results.

Best or luck!

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PostPosted: Sun Feb 15, 2009 1:06 am 
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doublehelix wrote:
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decided to go with engineered hardwood flooring throughout the studio, which is of a glue-down style.

I am looking at Lock and Fold Wood Flooring by Armstrong or similar Mirage product, which are engineered hardwood that lock together and float on sub floor rather that glue down in this case on concrete. Thought appreciated. Thanks.


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 16, 2009 1:16 am 
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JamesV wrote:
doublehelix wrote:
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decided to go with engineered hardwood flooring throughout the studio, which is of a glue-down style.

I am looking at Lock and Fold Wood Flooring by Armstrong or similar Mirage product, which are engineered hardwood that lock together and float on sub floor rather that glue down in this case on concrete. Thought appreciated. Thanks.



Hmmm... interesting! I am not sure if I have ever seen that style before. My flooring was a tongue and groove design, but it was designed to be glued down.

Let us know how it turns out for you. Gluing is a pain in the neck, and makes a nasty mess!

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 16, 2009 1:21 am 
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I would be very concerned about any floor that "floats" over a subfloor. We did an engineered wood floor that "floated" using a thin foam layer over the concrete in a mastering room. The result was not good for isolation. It created a panel resonance that amplified mid-range frequencies that were traveling through the concrete slab.

-ashley

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 16, 2009 8:02 am 
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bassman wrote:
I would be very concerned about any floor that "floats" over a subfloor. We did an engineered wood floor that "floated" using a thin foam layer over the concrete in a mastering room. The result was not good for isolation. It created a panel resonance that amplified mid-range frequencies that were traveling through the concrete slab.

-ashley

That potential issue alone would definitely be a concern and re-think going that route. Hope a solution found to resolve problem didn't involve having to tear everything out and start over?


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PostPosted: Sun May 17, 2009 7:47 pm 
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as I was browsing down some older threads.....

James, do you have any (more) detailed pix on how you made those corner basstraps? The cloth and trim work for example..


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 03, 2009 11:39 pm 
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Ro wrote:
James, do you have any (more) detailed pix on how you made those corner basstraps? The cloth and trim work for example..



Hey Ro, sorry I did not respond earlier... Now that my build is complete, I am pretty wrapped up in recording and mixing again (as I should be!) and not much attention gets paid to studio builds any more.

Most pictures have been posted here, but if you give me a bit more info on what you need specifically, I can try to post something that might help clarify.


Here is a quick summary using some of the older pictures:

1) 1" x 2" furrow strips are attached along the length of the wall so that the distance from the corner point to the inside edge of the strips is 17".

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2) Furrow strips are also attached to the ceiling and floor. The ends of these pieces will obviously need to be cut with 45 degree angles so that they fit nicely between the existing wall-mounted strips. Next, the fiberglass triangles are stacked and packed tightly

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3) I used some stretchable fabric that is breathable, which here in the States it is called "Ponte Roma". I was able to buy it in fairly large quantities at a place called "Joann Fabrics", which is a nation-wide chain over here. Not sure what would be the equivalent over in Europe, but the stretchiness made it easy to get it nice and taut without any drooping. On my ceiling cloud, I used burlap, and that was a real pain since it does not easily stretch. I know others have used cotton broadcloth, but that does not really stretch either, and would not work in the same way.

I start out by cutting out the fabric to the approximate size that I need. These traps are 2 feet across the front, so I cut my 56" wide sheets in half lengthwise, giving me two long pieces that are 28" wide. This gives me a few extra inches that will need to be trimmed once I have hung the fabric. Unfortunately, in the next picture below (the only one I could find), it does not look like I had pre-cut the fabric. This is a picture of the first trap that I did, so I was probably still learning the best way to go about the process.

When hanging the fabric, I started at the top, and using my pneumatic staple gun (the only way to do this is to go pneumatic!), and I would set a few staples into the outside of the furrow strip on one side, then stretch the fabric across the front of the trap so that it was tight, and then staple a few times on the other side. All of the staples are going into the OUTSIDE edge of the furrow strips AWAY from the fiberglass (basically, on the OUTSIDE of the trap). These first few staples are the most difficult, and you need to really make sure that the fabric is hanging straight. I used the weave pattern in the fabric to make sure that it was "level".

Once I got started, I just kept going back and forth a few staples at a time, making sure to stretch the fabric in a horizontal and a vertical (downwards) fashion.

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4) Next, I trimmed away the excess fabric. You can see that the staples need to be pretty close together since the fabric is stretched, the gaps between the staples need to be small otherwise you will see gaps in the edges into the traps. It is pretty difficult to trim this fabric once it is stapled to the furrow strips, especially right up against the wall. This picture is from one of my first attempts and is pretty ugly, but that is OK since it will be covered by trim pieces anyway. I did get better at it as I learned some tricks to make the cutting easier, but it is a pain no matter how you do it!

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5) Next, I cut, sanded, stained and polyurethane coated some 1/4 round trim pieces. I nailed these in place on top of the fabric, right into the corners where the furrow strips meet the wall.

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6) Here are a couple of pictures of the completed traps:

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Not sure if any of that helps, or if it is just some of the same old information rehashed again. Let me know if you have any specific questions.

Take care!

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PostPosted: Thu Jun 04, 2009 7:44 pm 
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thanx for taking the time to post them pix!
Now I know how you did it ;)

happy tracking!


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 04, 2009 9:41 pm 
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My pleasure.

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PostPosted: Tue Jun 09, 2009 10:51 pm 
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Great!
One tip tho. Cut 1/4 rounds or any moldings on 45 degrees when they join, so you have an even neater finish 8)

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PostPosted: Tue Jun 09, 2009 11:33 pm 
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jbassino wrote:
Great!
One tip tho. Cut 1/4 rounds or any moldings on 45 degrees when they join, so you have an even neater finish 8)



They are on a different plane, so they cannot join. The side pieces are "behind" the front and top pieces. I actually have different top and bottom pieces now anyway that are cut a different angles than those in the pictures.

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PostPosted: Mon Aug 31, 2009 1:25 am 
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On another note, I never really posted any final "finished" pictures, mostly because I do not have any! I took some with my little crappy point-and-shoot camera about a week for another thread on another forum, and I guess it is probably appropriate for completeness that I post them in this thread as well.

One of these days, I hope to get a *real* photographer down there to snap some decent shots.

The studio is a fully-functioning madhouse at this point! It is always in use, and it just sounds wonderful! It is pretty nice when you can design and build a studio to your own specifications... that way it has all the features and niceties that make YOUR life easier. Of course, you cannot design a place like that unless you have worked in less-than-optimal conditions for a long time, and I have to say, that my previous basement studio was certainly less-than-optimal (one room, hot, acoustically challenged, etc.).

One feature that I added to my place (at a HUGE cost) was to wire the crap out of it! Put wires and leads of every type in everyplace you can think of, and then add some more! It is really nice having access to any location from any other location in all formats.

The two biggest things I learned were to wire the crap out of the place (see above), and provide for LOTS of HVAC and fresh air. These seem to be 2 items that a lot of project studios seem to neglect or they become afterthoughts.

Of course, I never could have done it without the advice and encouragement of all of the folks here. A special thanks for course goes out to John Sayers for hosting this awesome resource!!!

I'll shut up now, and get to the pictures... If anyone is a photographer, lives in the Indianapolis area and wants to come take some better shots, be sure to let me know! ;)


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