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 Post subject: Mixing Room
PostPosted: Wed Sep 12, 2007 12:22 pm 
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Joined: Sun Mar 11, 2007 1:00 am
Posts: 68
Location: Huntsville, Alabama USA
Hello,
First of all i would like to thank john for kicking this design at me ,, and everyone else that has helped, inspired, and put up with all my questions :),,,although I'm sure I'll have more ;)


After a long 8 1/2 weeks of getting up around 5am, going to my job(drywall finishing contractor), coming home and working on this room till 11,,12 o'clock at night,,and from the time i wake till i just cant keep my eyes open on the weekends. During this time i didn't have an Internet connection at home to post pics as i went but I did take pics of everything i did as i went so i could share.

I am almost done with my build now, and have had my computers back up for few days and have been downloading pictures like mad off my camera to post and I'm sure its gonna take me a few days to get them all posted.
(although it seems i'm missing a couple, and am hoping my brother still has the ones i sent him )

The first thing i had to do was rip out the carpet that had been here since the previous owner, and see what i was up against as the floor had some pretty scary feeling humps under there.
What i had found was at some point an air conditioner had leaked and had ruined a good sized section of the 3/4 particle board underlayment, so i started to tear that section out an come to find when they installed the particle board over the plywood sub-floor, they had put a layer of roofing felt between the two and when the water ruined the particle board it never made it to the sub-floor so good call on that.

i decided to rip the whole layer of underlayment out as it had some swags between the floor joists,, and it all came up easier than i expected so i thought I'd just start fresh with a 2 layers of OSB Glued and screwed and stager jointed after i went under the house to try to even out the joists a little.

I got most of the floor joists leveled out and extra bracing but was left with 2 that were a little high that I'll just have to live with( and they fought me at a couple of steps too).

After all that was done i broke out the hand plane and went to work on the edges before i put down the veneer and the cherry hardwood looking sticky tile which looks great, the pictures don't do it justice.


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 13, 2007 12:45 pm 
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Joined: Sun Mar 11, 2007 1:00 am
Posts: 68
Location: Huntsville, Alabama USA
Sup? :)

OK,,now that the floor was in it was time to start building all the cabinetry.
I started off with 17 sheets of 3/4 particle board(and had to get 1 more due to a cutting mistake after working for 17 hrs, but as it turned out I was able to use up all of the mis cut piece so 18 total) and figured up a cutting plan to get the most out of my lumber with the least amount of waste.

I bought all new saw blades,and used Strait-edges, and "C" clamps and obsessive surgeon like measuring to make the cuts with the power saw.

I measured around the room from floor to ceiling and my lowest point was 95 1/4 in, due to the 2 high floor joists and maybe a low ceiling joist or two, anyway, I made the bottom cabs 45 1/2in, and the top cabs 49 1/2 in to give me a 95in total height.

I ripped 3/8 channels under the slat units and the speaker soffit units to allow
me to run my power strips underneath.

John had made a comment about building different chambers in the slat units to provide greater flexibility, so i kept that in mind and partitioned them down the center so i could insulate them different.

I also partitioned the front top unit( one of the missing pics, but you can see it in later shots) as I knew i would be hanging a flat screen from it and would need some sort of support. the bottom front isn't partitioned , i just have some bracing to help support the middle.

It took me 7 days, to measure, mark, cut, and assemble the 10 units,,plus 4 bottles of wood glue, and just over 10,000 trim gun nails.

when they were all built i covered the bottom of all the units with felt.

and then it was time to stack them and start caulking and insulating :)


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Last edited by MOSHWITZ on Thu Sep 13, 2007 1:11 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 13, 2007 12:53 pm 
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Joined: Sun Mar 11, 2007 1:00 am
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Location: Huntsville, Alabama USA
:)


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Sep 13, 2007 12:56 pm 
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Location: Huntsville, Alabama USA
oops forgot the original pic and cut pattern :oops:


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Last edited by MOSHWITZ on Thu Sep 13, 2007 1:18 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Sep 13, 2007 12:59 pm 
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Joined: Sun Mar 11, 2007 1:00 am
Posts: 68
Location: Huntsville, Alabama USA
:)

and a little test fit of my new JBL LSR 4328P on their rubber mats


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Sep 13, 2007 1:08 pm 
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Joined: Sun Mar 11, 2007 1:00 am
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Location: Huntsville, Alabama USA
Then came the acoustical caulk and the raw fingers :lol:


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Sep 14, 2007 12:52 am 
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Joined: Fri Feb 16, 2007 1:30 am
Posts: 115
Location: West Lothian, Scotland
Looking Good, I wish i had your skills with the saw i've had several miss cuts.

Keep up the good work

Cheers

Alan


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Sep 14, 2007 5:45 am 
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Joined: Sun Mar 11, 2007 1:00 am
Posts: 68
Location: Huntsville, Alabama USA
Sup?
Thanks for the comp. bro :) I could have done without all the little dilemmas and the "whew..glad i caught that before I ....." along the way ,and believe me it was "something" at every step.... but if it was easy,,hell,,everyone would be doing it :lol:

Now that i had everything in the room and stacked up, it was time to add the deadwood so the speaker soffit faces could have something to screw to, and get all the cabs aligned, screwed together, and squared up to each other and the room, and cut my hole between the top and bottom soffit units for the wiring and air to cool the powered JBL's

I used mending plates on the backs to keep them from shifting once i got them aligned and screwed them together at various points that can be unscrewed without having to go inside the cabs, for when the day come i have to move all the to another location i can do so without demo'ing anything.

Due to one of the high floor joists being the first one out from the wall on this side of the room(and they run side to side) I had to clamp the soffit cabs and slat cabs to keep them aligned when i screwed them together.
the other high floor joist is out toward the middle of the room and was only a moderate pain as it only really gave me a little trouble with getting the left slat cabs lined up with the soffit cabs.

when i was building the cabs it dawned on me about how was i going to get power run from the outlets to the inside of my space as the original plan is wall to wall, so there is no way to plug in a power strip without compromising the integrity of the cabs somehow.
I scratched my head for a while on this as i was building cabs, and the only solution i could come up with short of running new wire from under the floor to boxes in the new space,,
was to make the center absorbers shorter to allow the the combined soffit and slat cabs to be moved in, away from the walls 1.5 inches to accommodate a low profile plug.

I made the center units 6in. shorter so that gave me the 1.5 in. between the wall and the cabs and the 1.5 in between the center units and the soffits that i figured i could stuff with 703 and a piece of trim to cover the gap in case i had to do some finagling cause my room isn't exactly square :roll: . so there is more or less 1.5 in. between the wall and all the units.

I got the two sides in there respective places then got them squared up to each other, and bolted them with "L" brackets( soffits to the front wall and the opposite end of the slat cabs to the side walls) so they could not be bumped or moved out of line. i took a piece of string and a framers square from corner to corner on the floor and the ceiling at soffits to get them aligned and marked the ceiling so i could align the center cabs. then i taped the floor around the units so i could tell if any of it moves. I took the shot with the tape as i was staring at it all contemplating something that i don't recall :lol:

AAAANNNDD,,,due to the aforementioned P.I.T.A. :evil: front floor joist, the center section wanted to lean forward,,and more on one side than the other. To combat this little inconvenience, i installed Eye rings on the corners of the units and into the wall so i could run a cable through and tighten it up to help pull back the unit and just in case the unit should decide to fall forward after i hang my flat panel screen(which for now is only a 26 in. and will be upgraded to a 50 at some point :) ) the cable will not let it come crashing down.
When i got the unit in place and centered between the soffits, i installed little "L" brackets on the ceiling to keep it aligned with the soffits.

the screws in the wall came out, and if you look real hard you can see the eye ring in the the upper left near the soffit cab.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Sep 16, 2007 2:58 pm 
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Joined: Sun Mar 11, 2007 1:00 am
Posts: 68
Location: Huntsville, Alabama USA
SUP :)

OK, so now it was time to start insulating..
I stared with the soffit units first, they all got 3in of ridged Fiberglass on every surface and a piece to cover the top rear corner on the top units.

Then came time to do the center units and the slat units.

I strung the center units by marking a line on the sides and putting screws on the line and stringing around the screws. the center units have 6in. of R.F. and IIRC,,about 4 1/2 in of air space behind.

Now for the slat units, the larger side got got strung the same way as the center units, the narrow side however, got the screws in the back and i used a block while i was stringing to keep a uniformed air space.
The Narrow end has a constant 1in air space and 2 to (IIRC) 9in of R.F.,,the big side has a constant 6in of R.F. and a variable airspace.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Sep 16, 2007 3:08 pm 
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Location: Huntsville, Alabama USA
I did have to have a little help to get some pieces to stay put while i was cutting the next piece to go in, so i used a fine misting of the spray glue we use for custom corner bead products at work :)


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Sep 16, 2007 3:29 pm 
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Joined: Sun Mar 11, 2007 1:00 am
Posts: 68
Location: Huntsville, Alabama USA
Now it was time to staple the fabric onto the units.

O.K. LISTEN UP,,to these words of wisdom....

In the first pic, you will see a Stanly electric staple gun.

DO NOT PURCHASE THIS PRODUCT!!!!

this thing is the biggest piece of shit i have ever wasted 20 bucks on :evil:
If you look at the surrounding area in this pic you will see all the staples that just fell out as i ran my hand over them.

My father has one of these also, and we had the same problem just trying to re-attach some upholstery on a couch and some chairs a couple of years ago,,I thought maybe he had got a bum unit so i bought one thinking they got to be better now right?,, ,,NOOOO,,,they just suck.

I think when my room is completely done I'm gonna hang it in a tree out back and shoot it with my Desert Eagle 50 cal. to celebrate :twisted:


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Sep 16, 2007 6:43 pm 
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Joined: Tue Aug 10, 2004 8:10 pm
Posts: 1667
Location: Hawaii
Aloha,

Hey, looking good! (brought back some memories, too)
Quote:
In the first pic, you will see a Stanly electric staple gun. DO NOT PURCHASE THIS PRODUCT!!!!

I have the standard Stanley spring powered model and it had a few issues driving the staples as well. I ended up going over the offending staples with a hammer to drive them home.

Just curious, after installing the insulation in your cabs, how much of a difference in room sound did you notice?

Be safe and keep up the good work!

Aloha 8)

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Sep 16, 2007 11:47 pm 
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Joined: Sat Apr 28, 2007 10:19 pm
Posts: 468
Location: Indiana
Wow Moshwicz! Looking great! You have definitely got the knack with the woodwork... something that I don't seem to have the patience for.

I got an electric staple gun as well, Arrow brand (the same manufacturer of the staples that seem to be everywhere), and it sucks as well. Go pneumatic is my new mantra! I will never buy another crappy electric staple or nail gun again.

Keep the pics coming! I love it when you can make such fast progress through the process of the time warp when you start posting *after* you have competed the project! Hehe...

Anxious to see it finished!

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"Never interrupt your enemy when he is making a mistake."
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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Sep 17, 2007 5:28 am 
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Location: Nottingham, England
I have a cheap electric staple gun. I find the only way to get effective use from it is to push it into the workpiece as hard as possible before firing.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Sep 19, 2007 5:06 am 
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Joined: Sun Mar 11, 2007 1:00 am
Posts: 68
Location: Huntsville, Alabama USA
Sup?
thanks for the comps guys :)

kendale,,,,Ya, i could definitely notice that i was in the space between the cabs when i walked into that side of the room, i could listen as the timber of the "whir" from the air conditioner would change. After the cloud went up and the flutter disappeared on that side the whole "space" seemed to
"zero in",,for lack of a better term, and was quite noticeable .

Speaking of cloud,, this is how i went about doing mine.

I didn't want to have to build a frame for the cloud and spend any more on lumber than i already had, so i scratched my head until it just dawned on me how to just hang each panel.

First off , i already had the center of the ceiling marked ,then I measured out and marked every 2 ft. left and right.then screwed a 1x4 to the ceiling, (centered) on the marks and screwed a 1x4 3/4 away from the slat units running at the same angle.

I measured up (IIRC) 78in. from the floor and made a mark on each side of the center cabs. i taped a string on this mark, and ran it up at 12 deg. to the ceiling and taped it there. i measured out about 1.5 in. along the string and put a piece of tape. i then measured 4 ft. from that tape along the string and put another piece of tape, this would represent the length of the rigid fiberglass i was using to make the sections.

I then took a plumb line and held it to the ceiling to get the 4 foot mark and the 1.5 in. mark transfered onto the ceiling, then I did the same on the other side. I placed a screw-in hook on the 1x4's at the 1.5in mark away from all the units. I taped a string to the ceiling across the 4ft. marks an marked the center of the 1x4's on this line. I then took hook and put one on all the marks. this would give me the hanging points for the first set of sections.

For the second set, i measured back from the 4ft. hook 3.5in and made a line across all the 1x4's and placed another hook, then from that hook i measured(IIRC) 47in. and placed the hooks. I know they sound like odd measurements for (mostly) 2x4ft panels but there was method behind this madness as you will see.

OK,, each section is made up of 2 panels of 1.5 R.F. that i first wrapped in this material that i was given a whole 4ft. roll of, off one of my jobs about a year ago, that i thought might come in handy one day and that i can only describe as having about the same consistency as a dryer sheet.

Anyway, i folded the 2 panels up like a Christmas package, and taped the ends on the back till i could hot glue them so they wouldn't come undone.

Then i took my trusty orange speed square and marked a point in, 2in. from the sides at every corner. then i took a length of string and tied and hot glued a washer to the end, then measured the distance along the string i wanted the panel to hang and tied+glued another washer, with the rest of the length behind it. Then i took an embroidery needle with the string attached,and pushed it through where my 2in. points intersected and pulled it through till the washer was touching the panel, then brought the string around and threaded it through that washer and back around a few times till i ran out of string then tied it off and hot glued the knot, This leaves the desired distance of string to hang the panel with, as the washer on the end of the string gets put onto the hook .The cloud hangs about 2.5 in. off the ceiling

The reason for the odd measurements for the hooks and only one hook for two side by side panels to share, is that all the panels now push against each other in every direction making the whole thing a pretty tight and rigid structure.

To cover the panels with the final fabric i stretched the fabric around to the back and hot glued it. which leaves the exposed side with no punctures or frame. 8)

I also replaced the ceiling fan with a more befitting light, I had to slit the sides of the 2 panels around it for it light to come through( which i just slit the sides and hot glued a swatch of fabric in the cavity so there is no insulation exposed and looks pretty good too ;)


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