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 Post subject: Indonesian Control Room
PostPosted: Mon Jun 14, 2021 4:50 pm 
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Joined: Mon Jun 14, 2021 3:18 pm
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Location: Bali, Indonesia
Hi everyone, first time post here.

I'm from UK but living in Indonesia for the foreseeable future. I've got a lease on a building that eventually I want to convert it all into media use, but for now it just has plans for the groundfloor and to start with, just the control room in the garage for mixing in, but maybe in future it can turn into a drum room for tracking. I am more than likely to hire an acoustic consultant for the acoustics but I'm trying to learn as much as I can regarding the soundproofing side of things, so please be gentle ;)

The original walls are 6" masonry, along with either a 4" or 6" masonry slab for the floor above and the ground floor is sat on a raised earth and concrete foundation. To protect the original tiled floor I plan to use a 76mm steel frame grid, loaded with sand and glasswool, with 5mm rubber strips on top of the frame, with a layer of 15mm plywood, 5mm rubber, then another layer of 15mm plywood. Do I make things worse by using the sand filled frame? Or can i fix the U runners directly on layers of plywood lining the original tiled floor? I only want to protect the tiles, I know I'm not going to match the resonance of the foundation :)

The original dimensions of the garage are 606cm Length, 348cm Width, and 360cm Height to the concrete ceiling, and it has a metal rolling door at the main entrance. To help with the room modes I plan to shorten the room so the main space has interior drywall dimensions of 480cm Length, 320cm Width and 350cm drywall height, with a 14" insulation filled 'drop ceiling' covered with fabric. There will then be another partition with no access door to create a two leaf structure for the rolling door wall, however I am wondering whether the metal door would act as a third leaf - I want to keep the rolling door in place, would I be better off not building this 'dead air' partition and instead putting plywood and drywall layers on the exterior side of it?

Structurally, I plan to use metal studs, my contractor said he can build the whole frame to not touch the walls or ceiling, but I'm not sure how :D So if there was a runner on the plywood floor and a runner fixed into the original concrete ceiling, with a new drywall ceiling fitted from the new studs 10cm below that, filled with 10-15kg glasswool, will this provide enough decoupling? The cavity between the original masonry walls and the first plywood layer would be around 4-5", can I just stuff that whole cavity with the glasswool blanket or will I be better off with an air gap and 60kg rockwool sat in just the frame? I'm not sure how to fit a layer of rockwool directly onto the masonry wall, glue?

The drywall layers will consist of 2 layers of 15mm plywood, 1 layer of 15mm fire rated drywall, 1 layer of polymer modified bitumen to act as a deadsheet, then finally another layer of 15mm drywall. Would the 2 sheets of plywood be alot more effective than 1 layer or can I just use one?

Ventilation wise I plan to have a 6" vent in both the control room and the 'dead air' partition, with soffit boxes either side, and fit a split inverter AC with 3" pipe wrapped in insulation to control the condensation of the AC.

I apologise for the lack of sketchup drawings, I hope my paint mockups provide enough information to go along with this text, looking forward to all of your opinions!

Many thanks,

Muz


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 15, 2021 1:01 am 
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Location: Old Tappan, NJ USA
welcome! the plan looks good. i'd make the inner wall solid like the rest of the boundary. the roller door will not be a problem as far as third leaf goes in this design. just make sure all of those air gaps have insulation in them and particularly ensure that the metal door is damped.

as far as not coupling the inner and outer boundaries - use proper isolation sway bracing to support the inner walls and ceiling - esp since you're in a seismic zone.

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PostPosted: Tue Jun 15, 2021 3:14 pm 
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Joined: Mon Jun 14, 2021 3:18 pm
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Location: Bali, Indonesia
Thank you for the welcome Glen :) it's taken me months to build up the courage to post on here. The sway bracing is a very good point, and an example of how construction costs can rise so easily! There is a distributor here for mason products so I shall contact them.

My plan for the framing is to use what they call 'roof truss' here - it's 75mm, and a heavier gauge steel than the normal metal C studs, and it comes in 6m lengths to create the room within a room like with timber frame, but the more I think about it the more sensible it seems to layout the extra expense on the braces.

Do you think if I blocked the rolling door from the outside with concrete block, and then just built the 4.80x3.2x room without the dead air partition but instead a very large airgap (120+cm) I wouldn't lose any performance? I'm just thinking how I can save some money and put toward the bracing costs...

Many thanks,

Muz

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Control Room Layout 3 Birdseye English .pdf


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 16, 2021 12:34 am 
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if it's an option - remove the roller door and create a block wall there. store the roller door so you can reinstall at some point. it would improve things esp street noise. or if you need to keep the door in-place - build the wall behind it.

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PostPosted: Wed Jun 16, 2021 11:06 am 
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Location: Bali, Indonesia
Definitely an option.

Ok so my main two questions now are

1 layer of plywood or two? Considering i have two layers of 15mm gypsum and a bitumen dead sheet aswell. I mainly just want to have a wood surface to screw things into and gypsum here is cheaper.

The floor, can I just line the concrete tiled floor with plywood and screw the runners into that, or will I get better performance with the sandfilled raised floor previously discussed? It's a 2-3ft raised concrete earth foundation.

Many thanks!

Muz


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 16, 2021 11:21 pm 
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a single layer of plywood or OSB should do it. you should go with the earth damped concrete floor.

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PostPosted: Thu Jun 17, 2021 12:38 pm 
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Location: Bali, Indonesia
Thanks for that, I'll just line the tiled floor with several layers of plywood :)


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